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National Wildlife Federation

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image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "Speckled with morning dew, a tiny anole peeks over the lip of a pitcher plant, creating a vivid portrait. "He just went " - 1764724582655693991
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Speckled with morning dew, a tiny anole peeks over the lip of a pitcher plant, creating a vivid portrait. "He just went in and out, like he was going to sleep in there," says Anne Grimes, who watched the lizard from a photography shed she built in her North Carolina backyard. The yard is a National Wildlife Federation Certified Wildlife Habitat, where Grimes tends ponds and plants that nurture native wildlife. "It's a photographers' paradise," says Grimes. "But I spend more time watching than taking pictures." (Content sample from NWF’s )

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "“An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power” challenges teachers and students to propose climate solutions and take part in " - 1761706851198891651
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“An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power” challenges teachers and students to propose climate solutions and take part in shaping our climate resilient future. For , we’ve teamed up with @Participant & @caafoundation to ask teachers and students to enter their best climate solution ideas. Your school's project could be funded up to $20,000, so make sure to enter the challenge by April 22! “Jeff Skoll founded Participant Media based on the principle that every citizen can play a role in leading change. We are especially focused on inviting young people to get involved,” said Holly Gordon, Chief Impact Officer for Participant. “This program brings together youth, innovation, creativity and leadership - all vital ingredients to a sustainable future of peace and prosperity.” Grants will be awarded to projects that are well-researched, outcome-oriented, planned, communicated, well-promoted and evaluated. Applications will be reviewed by a committee of National Wildlife Federation staff and the top proposals will be determined by external judges. Click on the link in our bio ⬆️ to enter the challenge; download the Watch Kit; use the lesson plans and activities in Teach, Learn, Act; and get a list of climate action and resilient community projects to help develop the best ideas for your school or community!

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "Insect decline is bad news for all animal species, including us humans. "We need insects. Nearly 40% of all animal speci" - 1758928345083769212
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Insect decline is bad news for all animal species, including us humans. "We need insects. Nearly 40% of all animal species on Earth are herbivorous insects. They convert plants into food, in the form of themselves, for all other species." Here are a few ways you can love the bugs in your yard. 1. Learn to see insect activity in your yard as a positive sign of a healthy ecosystem. 2. Have your soil tested, plant the right plants for your soil and region, and make sure they have enough light and water because healthy plants are better able to fight off pests. 3. Become familiar with the insects in your yard, both good and bad. 4. Boost the beneficial insects in your yard because they’ll help control garden pests for free. 5. Attract birds to help control the pests. (Content sample from NWF’s , 📸: @claybolt)

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "Grassland birds like the bobolink, whose numbers have been cut in half over the last 40 years, have seen their habitat o" - 1755154649286426984
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Grassland birds like the bobolink, whose numbers have been cut in half over the last 40 years, have seen their habitat on native prairie and pasture converted to cropland and destroyed. The federal mandate to blend ethanol into our gasoline has been a disaster for wildlife species—encouraging and subsidizing the destruction of these vanishing ecosystems. The GREENER Fuels Act offers solutions to help prevent habitat loss and bring bobolinks and other native birds back to the landscape. How? The act would reduce the amount of fuel produced from crops, like corn and soybeans, which have taken over millions of acres of bobolink habitat. Also, the legislation would establish a new fund to support U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s work with landowners to protect habitat on their land, and restore habitat that has been lost. The bobolink, the monarch butterfly, and so many other beloved American species can no longer wait. You can tell Congress today to support the GREENER Fuels Act (H.R. 5212/S. 2519) and protect the grassland habitat bobolinks depend on for future generations -- link in bio.

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "Bees need our help.  That’s why we’ve partnered with Beesponsible to shine a light on declining bee populations and to e" - 1753748661685696342
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Bees need our help. That’s why we’ve partnered with Beesponsible to shine a light on declining bee populations and to empower people everywhere to take action to help bees thrive. After you learn six ways you can help bees thrive, please share how you plan to help bees below with your post and tag @beesponsible. They’ll donate a dollar for each one to support our programs such as our bee-friendly garden efforts. Learn more at our blog – link in bio ⬆️

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt’s repeated ethical lapses in judgement that undermine the credibility of the Environmenta" - 1751808225567854396
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EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt’s repeated ethical lapses in judgement that undermine the credibility of the Environmental Protection Agency (@epagov) and have rendered him unfit to serve. As a bipartisan, science-based, and collaborative organization, this is not a decision that we come to lightly. We steadfastly support the Environmental Protection Agency’s mission to protect human health and the environment. Mr. Pruitt’s financial entanglements with lobbyists and his repeated indiscretions have disqualified him from being able to fulfill the Agency’s mission. The American people simply cannot have confidence that he will act in the best interest of the nation. Call your Senator today to urge them to call to for Scott Pruitt’s removal or resignation – link in bio. ⬆️

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "When your headquarters is a Certified Wildlife Habitat, you have to drive extra slow through the parking lots." - 1750828191783777368
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When your headquarters is a Certified Wildlife Habitat, you have to drive extra slow through the parking lots.

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "Did you know, not all bats eat insects? Sure, eating insects is by far the most common diet found among the 1,300 specie" - 1749517512367755102
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Did you know, not all bats eat insects? Sure, eating insects is by far the most common diet found among the 1,300 species of bats worldwide, however the pollinating role many of our nectar-feeding bats play is just as important. Scientists believe that many groups of plants have evolved to attract bats, as they are able to carry much larger amounts of pollen in their fur compared to other pollinators. The ability of bats to fly long distances is also another benefit to plants, especially those that occur in low densities or in habitats far apart from each other. Without nectar feeding bats not only would our environment suffer, but our way of living as well!

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "#Repost @tiffanithiessen with @get_repost
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#dontkillmybuzz 1 in 3 bites of food we take relies on bee pollination. Wi" - 1749404258258955070
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@tiffanithiessen with @get_repost ・・・ 1 in 3 bites of food we take relies on bee pollination. Without them, our food production would be in serious trouble. But bee populations have been declining at alarming rates. That’s why @Beesponsible created , a social media driven t-shirt campaign in support of @nationalwildlife and its pollinator-friendly, pesticide-free gardening and conservation efforts. And the t-shirts are super cute.

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "With their low metabolism and predator-proof hard shells, our native freshwater turtles are well equipped to live a long" - 1748823427517779358
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With their low metabolism and predator-proof hard shells, our native freshwater turtles are well equipped to live a long life. But traffic on roads slicing through habitats along with the polluting and destruction of streams, ponds and wetlands are putting three species of turtles at risk of disappearing altogether. Time is running out for Blanding’s, wood and spotted turtles. These declining species inhabit parts of the central and eastern U.S. and Canada. Wherever they live, the challenge is to protect adult turtles and assure hatchlings and young turtles make it to breeding age. Time is running out for Blanding’s, wood and spotted turtles. These declining species inhabit parts of the central and eastern U.S. and Canada. Wherever they live, the challenge is to protect adult turtles and assure hatchlings and young turtles make it to breeding age. The good news? State wildlife agencies and partners have a plan to set these turtles on a path to recovery by 2023. Funding from the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act can make it happen. But only if the wildlife-saving legislation passes. Check out the link in our bio to learn more about what the bill and what you can do for wildlife! ⬆️🐢 habitat

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "As the name suggests, the jackalope is a cross between a jackrabbit and an antelope, resulting in a small cute bunny wit" - 1747904885610985123
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As the name suggests, the jackalope is a cross between a jackrabbit and an antelope, resulting in a small cute bunny with horns. Contrary to their adorable outside, jackalopes are reportedly very aggressive, leading to the nickname of the “warrior rabbit”. When provoked, jackalopes can imitate human sounds and even speech, though their angry impulses can be assuaged by the judicious application of whiskey. Jackalopes were first reported in Wyoming between 1829 and 1939 when a pair of brothers spotted a dead rabbit next to a pair of horns. Sightings still occur throughout the American West. Jackalopes are now the official creature of Wyoming, and each year many festivals occur centering on the bunny with horns. **JUST KIDDING!** Happy April Fool’s Day! While many swear that the jackalope is real, there is no scientific evidence that they ever existed. Most likely people spotted a rabbit with a deformity that may have resembled horns.

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "Baseball season is now in full swing (see what we did there) :) Did you know, the Baltimore oriole was named because its" - 1747348270834794224
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Baseball season is now in full swing (see what we did there) :) Did you know, the Baltimore oriole was named because its coloring is similar to the colors on the heraldic crest of Lord Baltimore? But you can also find them outside the Charm City. In fact, they can be seen in the eastern United States and as far west as Montana. Their preferred habitat is open deciduous woodlands and also do quite well in community parks and suburban backyards. They forage in the treetops and commonly build nests in American elms, cottonwoods, and maples. Eggs and young birds are especially vulnerable to predators such as squirrels, owls, large birds, and domestic cats. Adults put up a fight by sounding alarm calls and mobbing predators.