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National Wildlife Federation

Bio See the stunning wildlife and landscapes we work to protect!

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image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "A great blue heron looks over Great Falls on the Potomac River, just upstream from Washington, D.C. The once-foul river " - 1721327392147326799
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A great blue heron looks over Great Falls on the Potomac River, just upstream from Washington, D.C. The once-foul river runs far cleaner today thanks to EPA water regulations. Decades ago, firemen blasted water toward a flaming tugboat after an oil slick on Ohio’s Cuyahoga River caught fire in 1952, one of several blazes that plagued the polluted waterway.

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image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "Settling in for a long winter’s nap, a polar bear cub curls close to its sleeping mother on the snowy edge of Kaktovic, " - 1714084684634601933
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Settling in for a long winter’s nap, a polar bear cub curls close to its sleeping mother on the snowy edge of Kaktovic, Alaska, along the Beaufort Sea. Photographing the pair from a nearby boat, Missy Mandel was captivated by the tiny town and the numerous bears that gather there, waiting for the ice to freeze so they can head out to hunt for seals. “I needed to see this magical place,” says Mandel, an avid fan of photographing wildlife, especially mothers and their young. “I just have a connection I can’t explain.” (Content sample from NWF's )

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image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "For those who consider awareness of mortality a uniquely human trait, the idea that other animals pine for the dead migh" - 1713427587563752944
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For those who consider awareness of mortality a uniquely human trait, the idea that other animals pine for the dead might be hard to imagine. Indeed, some scientists remain skeptical. But a growing number are challenging our species’ monopoly on grief. They’ve identified mourninglike behaviors not just in cetaceans, but in elephants, giraffes, chimpanzees and other primates and, possibly, turtles, bison and birds. Even today, many researchers stay away from the language of emotion. “‘Grieving’ is a word that is perceived as illegal among scientists,” says biologist Giovanni Bearzi, president of Dolphin Biology and Conservation, a nonprofit research organization based in Italy. “Our capability of understanding what happens from an animal’s standpoint is pretty limited." (Content sample from NWF's )

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "The American beaver's most noticeable characteristic is the long, flat, black tail. A beaver’s tail not only helps it sw" - 1705420364740619632
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The American beaver's most noticeable characteristic is the long, flat, black tail. A beaver’s tail not only helps it swim faster, but can also be used to make a loud alarm call when slapped against water. In addition, the large tail helps the beaver balance when carrying a heavy log or tree trunk. The American beaver is the largest rodent in the United States, growing from two to three feet (0.6 to 0.9 meters) long, not including the tail. They have dark-brown waterproof fur and webbed feet. Beaver teeth grow continuously throughout their lives, and beavers must gnaw on trees to keep their teeth from getting too long. Thick layers of enamel on their teeth give them an orange color.

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "The whooping crane is one of North America’s most majestic birds. Standing five feet tall, with a seven-foot wingspan, t" - 1704505708278903142
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The whooping crane is one of North America’s most majestic birds. Standing five feet tall, with a seven-foot wingspan, the bird’s snow white plumage, black legs, and red spot on its head make it unmistakable. The whooping crane is also one of the nation’s most famous comeback stories. As many as 20,000 whooping cranes were once found throughout North America. But by 1941, habitat loss and unregulated hunting—in part for the birds’ plumage—had reduced the whooping crane’s numbers to less than two dozen individuals in the wild. Despite the strong upward trend in recent years, whooping cranes as a species remain at very real risk of extinction. Few species are as close to extinction as the whooping crane once was, but scientists believe that as many as one-third of American wildlife species are in decline or at increased risk. A new bipartisan bill called the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act would fund state-led efforts on behalf of these wildlife.

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "Backyard bird feeders are easy, convenient and available in a dizzying variety of sizes, styles and colors to suit any w" - 1698852299475485963
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Backyard bird feeders are easy, convenient and available in a dizzying variety of sizes, styles and colors to suit any wildlife gardener’s tastes. But what can you do when feeders aren’t an option? Because of the mess feeders can make, some homeowners’ associations ban them. Feeders also may attract unwelcome nectar- and seed-stealing visitors, including squirrels, rats, raccoons or even large predators such as bears. And some backyard birders want to provide food but find it inconvenient to fill and clean feeders. Fortunately, there’s an easy solution—and it may even be better for birds. Natural foods such as shrubs, trees and other plants can be just as easy and convenient as feeders, and they provide additional benefits. “Plantings create more of an ecosystem, attracting a wider variety of birds,” says Kimberly Kaufman, executive director of the Black Swamp Bird Observatory in Ohio and co-author of the Kaufman Field Guide to Nature of the Midwest. “Flowers, trees and shrubs also provide cover and nesting habitat as well as important nectar for pollinators and host plants for butterflies and moths.” A wide variety of plants can nurture backyard birds: Nectar-rich flowers like bee balm, salvia and lupine are magnets for hummingbirds. Seed-bearing blooms, including coneflowers and cosmos, attract finches, sparrows, doves and quail. Jays are partial to nuts provided by trees such as hickories, pecans and walnuts, while fruit-loving birds, from orioles to waxwings, flock to sumacs, serviceberries, junipers and other berry bushes. Larger fruit trees, including crabapples and hollies, are top draws for grosbeaks, tanagers, catbirds and mockingbirds. (Content sample from NWF's )