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NASA

Bio Explore the universe and discover our home planet with the official NASA Instagram account

Website http://www.nasa.gov/

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NASA (@nasa) Instagram photos and videos

List of Instagram medias taken by NASA (@nasa)

image by NASA (@nasa) with caption : "Amid all this beauty lies mayhem. A monster young star 200,000 times brighter than our Sun is blasting powerful ultravio" - 1764638162845639666
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Amid all this beauty lies mayhem. A monster young star 200,000 times brighter than our Sun is blasting powerful ultraviolet radiation & stellar winds, carving out a fantasy landscape of ridges, cavities and mountains of gas & dust. This colorful image, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble), celebrates the Earth-orbiting observatory’s 28th anniversary of viewing the heavens, giving us a window seat to the universe’s extraordinary tapestry of stellar birth and destruction. Above the distortion of Earth's atmosphere, Hubble has an unobstructed view of the universe. Scientists have used Hubble to observe the most distant stars and galaxies as well as the planets in our solar system. Hubble has taken over a million observations and provided data that astronomers have used to write more than 15,000 peer-reviewed scientific publications on a broad range of topics, from planet formation to gigantic black holes. Credits: NASA, @EuropeanSpaceAgency and @Space_Telescopes

image by NASA (@nasa) with caption : "“NASA represents what is best about the United States of America.  We lead, we discover, we pioneer and we inspire,” say" - 1764134532497494231
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“NASA represents what is best about the United States of America. We lead, we discover, we pioneer and we inspire,” says Jim Bridenstine, our newly sworn-in administrator. Earlier today, Vice President Mike Pence (@VP) swore in Bridenstine as our 13th administrator who will oversee our ongoing mission of exploration and discovery. During the ceremony, Bridenstine had an opportunity to talk to three of our out-of-this-world employees living and working on the International Space Station (@ISS). A pilot in the U.S. Navy Reserve and former executive director of the Tulsa Air and Space Museum and Planetarium, Bridenstine served on the House Armed Services Committee and the Science, Space and Technology Committee. Image credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

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Happy ! We use the vantage point of space to increase our understanding of our home planet, improve lives, and safeguard our future. We monitor Earth’s vital signs from land, air and space with a fleet of satellites and ambitious airborne and ground-based observation campaigns. We develop new ways to observe and study Earth's interconnected natural systems with long-term data records. And we freely share this unique knowledge and works with institutions around the world. Scientists worldwide use our data to tackle some of the biggest questions about how our planet is changing now and how Earth could change in the future. From rising sea levels to the changing availability of freshwater, we enables studies that unravel the complexities of our planet from the highest reaches of Earth’s atmosphere to its core. Our Earth science work also makes a difference in people’s lives around the world every day. From farms to our national parks, from today’s response to natural disasters to tomorrow’s air quality, from the Arctic to the Amazon, we're working for you 24/7. Our expertise in space and scientific exploration contributes to essential services provided to the American people by other federal agencies, such as weather forecasting and natural resource management. All of this new knowledge about our home planet enables policy makers, government agencies and other stakeholders to make more informed decisions on critical issues that occur all around the world. Credits: NASA #🌎 #🌍 #🌏

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Our Solar Dynamics Observatory watched an active region on the Sun — an area with intense, complex magnetic activity — rotate into view on April 18-19, seen here in extreme ultraviolet. These bright, towering arches consist of charged particles spiraling along magnetic field lines that were revealed in this view in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. They rise up above the Sun's surface many times the size of Earth. This view covers just 16 hours of activity and our scientists are keeping their eyes on this region to see if it has the potential to produce solar storms. Video Credit: NASA/SDO

image by NASA (@nasa) with caption : "Ice, ice baby! Sea ice is seen outside in this view from our P-3 research aircraft's bubble windows during a flight cond" - 1761909645359784499
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Ice, ice baby! Sea ice is seen outside in this view from our P-3 research aircraft's bubble windows during a flight conducted on April 16, 2018, to gather data as part of our Operation IceBridge mission. Using a fleet of research aircraft, Operation IceBridge monitors Earth's polar ice to better understand annual changes in the thickness of sea ice, glaciers and ice sheets. IceBridge collects data to bridge the gap between ICESat and the forthcoming ICESat-2 satellites. This mission is part of a focus on Earth's frozen regions at a time when decades of observations from the ground, air and space have revealed signs of change in Earth's ice sheets, sea ice, glaciers, snow cover and permafrost. Collectively, scientists call these frozen regions of our planet the "cryosphere." Ongoing changes with the cryosphere, while often occurring in remote regions, have impacts on people all around the world: sea level rise affects coastlines globally, more than a billion people rely on water from snowpack, and the diminishing sea ice that covers the Arctic Ocean plays a significant role in Earth's climate and weather patterns. Image Credit: NASA

image by NASA (@nasa) with caption : "What would you name this massive galaxy cluster? Despite its beauty, it bears the distinctly unpoetic name of PLCK G308." - 1761264353243152022
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What would you name this massive galaxy cluster? Despite its beauty, it bears the distinctly unpoetic name of PLCK G308.3-20.2. Galaxy clusters can contain thousands of galaxies all held together by the glue of gravity. At one point in time they were believed to be the largest structures in the universe — until they were usurped in the 1980s by the discovery of superclusters. These massive formations typically contain dozens of galaxy clusters and groups and span hundreds of millions of light-years. However, clusters do have one thing to cling on to: superclusters are not held together by gravity, so galaxy clusters still retain the title of the biggest structures in the universe bound by gravity. Credit: ESA/@NasaHubble/NASA  

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LIFTOFF! Our Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) launched at 6:51 p.m. EDT from Space Launch Complex 40 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to search for unknown worlds beyond our solar system. When a planet crosses in front of the star it’s orbiting, that event is called a transit – and the telltale sign of a transit is a drop in the brightness of that star’s light. TESS is heading into high Earth orbit, where it will rely on the transit method to locate planets that are outside our solar system, but close enough to study with ground-based telescopes. Since its launch in 2009, our Kepler space telescope has discovered nearly 2,700 of these worlds orbiting other stars known as “exoplanets” using the transit method. Now Kepler, the past master of transits, is passing the torch of discovery to TESS whose adventure is just beginning... Credit: NASA

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How do we spot something as tiny and faint as a planet trillions of miles away? The trick is to look at the star! So far, most of the exoplanets – worlds beyond our solar system – we’ve found were detected by looking for tiny dips in the brightness of their host stars! These dips are caused by the planet passing between us and its star – an event called a “transit.” Our newest planet hunter, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), will seek out transits around 200,000 of the nearest and brightest stars in the sky. TESS is slated to launch tomorrow, April 18, at 6:51 p.m. EDT on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Credit: @NASAGoddard

image by NASA (@nasa) with caption : "Today, on the other side of the globe, an astronomy experiment to study how stars are born took flight.

To the casual o" - 1759149881351329942
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Today, on the other side of the globe, an astronomy experiment to study how stars are born took flight. To the casual onlooker, the space between the stars is benign and quiet. But, vast clouds of neutral atoms and molecules, as well as charged plasma particles drift in this area called the interstellar medium — that may, over millions of years, evolve into new stars and even planets. These clouds have very low densities and the only way to study them is to measure how a cloud is affected by a star — and its associated outpouring of stellar material, the stellar wind — moving through it. This afternoon at 12:47 p.m. EDT, the fourth iteration of our Colorado High-resolution Echelle Stellar Spectrograph (CHESS-4) mission lifted off from the Kwajalein Atoll in The Republic of the Marshall Islands aboard a Black Brant IX research rocket to study these floating interstellar reservoirs and the earliest stages of star formation. The CHESS-4 instrument was developed by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Credit: NASA

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Today at the National Space Foundation's 34th , Vice President Mike Pence (@VP) congratulated Acting Administrator Lightfoot on his 30 years of service and reemphasized plans to return humans to the Moon. To learn more about our missions what's next for us visit nasa.gov. Credit: @SpaceFoundation

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What’s up for April in the night sky? The Lyrid Meteor Shower, which peaks on April 22! Mid-April, start looking for the Lyrid meteors, which are active from April 14 – 30. In the early morning sky, a patient observer will see up to a dozen or more meteors per hour. Observers in the United States should see good meteor rates on the nights before and after the April 22 peak. A bright first quarter Moon plays havoc with sky conditions, but Lyra will be high overhead after the Moon sets at midnight, so that’s the best time to look for Lyrids! Credit: NASA

image by NASA (@nasa) with caption : "For phytoplankton in Louisiana’s Lake Pontchartrain, ideal conditions to flourish recently included a combination of amp" - 1756767774795004113
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For phytoplankton in Louisiana’s Lake Pontchartrain, ideal conditions to flourish recently included a combination of ample sunlight and nutrients, a long stretch of warm weather, and calm winds. Colorful blooms of phytoplankton appeared on the north side of Lake Pontchartrain several times in March 2018, seen here on March 3, 2018 by the Landsat 8 satellite. Lake Pontchartrain and other nearby lakes and inlets compose a huge estuary east of the Mississippi Delta. Unusually warm temperatures in February and March helped spur the early spring bloom, even before nutrients from the Upper Mississippi River could pour into the region. Blooms become more likely when excess river nutrients reach the lake through the Bonnet Carré Spillway. During flood season, the spillway is occasionally opened to divert excess water from the Mississippi River and relieve pressure on levees near New Orleans. On March 8, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers started to open the spillway in response flooding along the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. Such inputs of nutrients—often fertilizer from the Mississippi watershed—can set the stage for large blooms of algae and cyanobacteria—single-celled organisms that can contaminate drinking water and pose a risk to human and animal health. Satellite imagery can help identify the occurrence of a phytoplankton bloom, but direct sampling is required to discern the species. Image credit: NASA/@USGS