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Brian Skerry

Bio National Geographic Photographer // Speaker // Author // Rolex Explorer of the Year

Website http://BrianSkerry.com/

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National Geographic (@natgeo) Instagram Profile Photo natgeo

National Geographic

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Paul Nicklen

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National Geographic Travel

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Thomas Peschak

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National Geographic Creative

SeaLegacy #TurningTheTide (@sea_legacy) Instagram Profile Photo sea_legacy

SeaLegacy #TurningTheTide

Brian Skerry (@brianskerry) Instagram photos and videos

List of Instagram medias taken by Brian Skerry (@brianskerry)

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image by Brian Skerry (@brianskerry) with caption : "Photo by @BrianSkerry
Happy #WorldWhaleDay - A pair of Southern Right Whales engage in courtship in the waters off the A" - 1717070591523878719
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Photo by @BrianSkerry Happy - A pair of Southern Right Whales engage in courtship in the waters off the Auckland Islands in New Zealand’s sub-antarctic. Their cousins, the North Atlantic Right Whales, are the most endangered species of whale on Earth, with only about 450 remaining. Both species were hunted to the brink of extinction by early whalers, but the Southern species, while also endangered, recovered better, due to the fact that they live further away from human industrialization. Being in this chilly water water with 45-foot long whales that weigh 70-tons was a little intimidating, but absolutely beautiful. As an underwater photographer, I cannot use long, telephoto lenses to photograph my subjects or wait in a camouflaged blind for days on end. I can only stay underwater as long as the air supply on my back lasts and must get very close to make pictures. When animals like these whales allow you into their world it is a very special experience. Photographed on assignment for @natgeo @subal_underwater_housing

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image by Brian Skerry (@brianskerry) with caption : "Photo by @BrianSkerry
A Great White Shark swims through an undersea forest, approaching a ray, in the waters off South A" - 1716228211627440496
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Photo by @BrianSkerry A Great White Shark swims through an undersea forest, approaching a ray, in the waters off South Australia. The largest predatory fish in the sea, the great white remains somewhat enigmatic, with much of its life and behaviors unknown. As a visual storyteller working in the sea for decades, I am always thinking about how to create images that will engage the viewer. I search for places and brief moments during which I can make a picture that will make people want to know more about the animal or place. Producing such images requires spending a lot of time underwater, waiting for that elusive moment that will resonate as a photograph. Photographed for @natgeo @subal_underwater_housing

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WINTER FREEDIVING - Near my home on the coast of Maine I’ve been practicing my freediving techniques, even in winter. The air temperature today was 36-degrees F and water temp. was 39-degrees F. But I absolutely love being in the sea during every season and in almost any conditions. A cup of hot chocolate after this session made it the perfect day! Video of @BrianSkerry by my friend and colleague Lu Lamar. @hecsaquatic hecsaquatic

Instagram Image by Brian Skerry (@brianskerry) with caption : "Photo by @BrianSkerry. 
A harp seal pup - about 2 weeks old - makes its first swim beneath the ice shelf in Canada’s Gul" at Gulf of Saint Lawrence - 1708909217551600492
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Photo by @BrianSkerry. A harp seal pup - about 2 weeks old - makes its first swim beneath the ice shelf in Canada’s Gulf of St. Lawrence. Harp seal pups need stable pack ice from which to nurse from their mothers. Thinning ice due to climate change over the last decade has caused problems for this species, with pup mortality rates increasing during years with little ice. Survival long term will require adapting to the loss of sea ice if these trends continue. @thephotosociety @natgeocreative Photographed on assignment for @NatGeo.

Instagram Image by Brian Skerry (@brianskerry) with caption : "Photo by @BrianSkerry. 
Looking slightly wary of the photographer, a school of black margate fish drift in the water col" at Belize - 1705154092093876395
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Photo by @BrianSkerry. Looking slightly wary of the photographer, a school of black margate fish drift in the water column of Belize’s Hol Chan marine reserve. This marine protected area - located off of Ambergris Caye - was created in 1987, allowing marine life and ecosystems to thrive over the past three decades. Most researchers tell us that at least 30% of Earth’s oceans must be protected in order to have a healthy planet, yet today only about 3% of these waters have been conserved. The ocean is the greatest carbon sink on Earth, taking in carbon and giving back oxygen. As fish populations are decimated and increased amounts of carbon from fossil fuels are added to the water, ecosystems are destroyed and the ocean loses its ability to function efficiently. Creating more marine protected areas then is not only good for fish, but for all life on earth.

Instagram Image by Brian Skerry (@brianskerry) with caption : "Photo by @BrianSkerry. 
A two-day old humpback whale calf swims alongside its mother in the waters off of the Cook Islan" at Cook Islands - 1703825060416833218
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Photo by @BrianSkerry. A two-day old humpback whale calf swims alongside its mother in the waters off of the Cook Islands, in the South Pacific. This population of humpbacks spends its summer feeding in Antarctica, migrating to warmer waters where calves are born in the winter. The bond between moms and their calves is strong, with calves spending their first year with their mothers. During this time, mother humpback whales feed and provide protection for their young. Although much has been learned about this species throughout the past several decades of research, many mysteries remain with regards to the many complex societies in the sea. @thephotosociety @natgeocreative